A Down Day

Written by Barry Warsaw in house on Sat 17 January 2009.

Not too much happening today. The guys were going to start framing, and though there's a big pile of wood out there, there's no sign of that happening. They did start framing out the floor for the new bay window.

Steve and I did get a chance to get inside and look around. We were actually looking for a couple of stands for the dumpster drums I'm loaning his son Graham (a good friend of my son Max and a budding Neil Peart). Well, we couldn't find the stands -- they're either in the pods or gone gone gone -- but it was good to walk around with Steve. The basement step-up was jackhammered, but we haven't yet heard the gravitational verdict, and it looks like the temporary walls were built in the basement. I suspect the basement stairs will be ripped out before we know it.

We have got to wrap the sofa bench that we left in the house. It's huge and difficult to move, but not only was it heavily dusted, we noticed that there was a McDonalds drink cup left on it by one of the workers. I'll probably head to the hardware store and do that before we get too much farther.

It was also really cool to walk around the new foundation, see the poured walls from the inside and get a sense of what the new space will be like. We had a question about the window cut outs on the Louis side of the basement since there are supposed to be three windows there, but there are only two cut outs. The third is in the interface between the old and new house, so we think they'll just carve out what they need once the back wall comes down. We'll verify that with the …

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Foundations

Written by Barry Warsaw in house on Fri 16 January 2009.

I had a chance to see the poured foundation walls today. Originally, we were thinking to use block construction, but there's no arguing with the speed at which the poured concrete walls went up. Our builder has a lot of experience with this construction method, and our architect is cool with it so it's the way we went. Jane's not psyched about the formed brick impressions (she detests fake attempts when something tries to look like what it's not), but all that is going to get stuccoed anyway so you'll never see it.

(Aside: Jane gives me grief because this is all boring and not funny. I keep telling her that things are moving so fast, and there's so much information to get in that there isn't time to be funny. Don't worry! I'm sure there will be plenty to laugh about later.)

One big question that we have is whether we're going to need an ejector pump in the basement or not. The basement bathroom is above a step-up at the bottom of the basement stairs. We don't really know what's under that step-up. Ideally of course, the sewage line is below the grade of the new basement bathroom and we'll just let gravity do what it does best. If not, we'll need an ejector pump to get the, er, goo up from the lower bathroom into the main sewage line. If necessary, we'll hide the ejector pump under the stairs just as we're doing with the sump pump. We think there's enough room there. Tomorrow hopefully, we'll get that step-up jackhammered and take a look at what's there.

The other issue is the gas meter, which is currently inside what was the utility room, but what will be the family room if we finish the basement. Of course …

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Compromise, and progress

Written by Barry Warsaw in house on Thu 15 January 2009.

(Happy Birthday, Mom!)

Today we had a production meeting at 7am with the builder, his project manager, and our architect. We talked about a bunch of things, including the need to raise the windows behind the kitchen banquette (for the seat backs), the fact that the original slab isn't level (but only slightly, and we don't yet know what the impact on the new slab will be), and what we'll use to frame the floor of the porch. Interestingly enough, one sheet of the plans calls for Trex while another leaves it unspecified, and our contract states Trex as an alternative. Neither our architect nor we really care too much as long as it is structurally sound and has water and ice guards. Later, our builder related that they preferred to wood frame it.

There's an unconditioned space below the porch, but my eventual hope is that in a few years we'll close that off, bring in HVAC and electrical and possibly be able to finish it. It's a nice little space, but we really can't afford to finish it now, so it'll mostly be used to store lawnmowers, bikes and the lot. Someday it might make a nice little area for Jane's pottery studio perhaps.

Another interesting thing about that space: I wanted to put a concrete ramp in next to the stairs, so we've actually designed a 6' wide entrance. Unfortunately, even though that ramp was approved by the county, it turns out that it's not up to code after all, so we're going to put stairs in across the entire 6 feet and then probably put in a wooden ramp or some such for the few times I need to haul gear up and down. I'm disappointed, but we can work around it.

As mentioned yesterday, we …

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A big ol' pile of dirt

Written by Barry Warsaw in house on Wed 14 January 2009.

It's amazing how quickly things have happened. The project manager (Tom) is a great guy and he's explained that we'll see a lot of progress early on, but that once the addition is framed and under roof, things will appear to slow. Plumbing, electrical and HVAC all take a long time to complete. That's okay, right now it's very exciting!

Today the excavation was largely complete. There is now a BIG hole in the backyard, stretching almost all the way back to the tree line. This is sure going to eat up most of our backyard. There's also a ditch along the side of the house (which, because we're on a corner lot faces the street we are not addressed on), and a hole near the front door where the bay window will go. Footers were poured today for all of that.

We hit our first snag, namely in where the sump pump is going to go. The original plans were going to put this under the unconditioned space under the porch, but that's not allowed or recommended because it can freeze. Since that space will (for now) be open, you just don't want the sump pump to be exposed to the elements. We've decided to move the sump pump to under the basement stairs, which are barely usable as it is because it's such a small space. We'll have access to the pump from a utility door and it'll still drain out of the side of the house. The unconditioned area will still have a floor drain to handle any rain and such.

We briefly toyed with the idea of enclosing the unconditioned area, running HVAC and electrical to it, so that we could use it as an additional room, but because of the way the stairs and ramp …

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Where'd my house go?

Written by Barry Warsaw in house on Tue 13 January 2009.

Well, we woke up this morning to find most of our house gone. Actually, we'd sort of expected it since the county approved our plans on Friday. We've been in our house in suburban Washington DC for more than 6 years and always planned on doing a renovation project. It's taken this long for us to get off our butts and finish the plans, line up a builder, arrange financing, and so on. Given the sorry state of the housing market, this is either the smartest thing we've done, or the dumbest.

Anyway, we were expecting to break ground tomorrow, but Jane had to go up to the school this morning and saw the project manager on her way. He asked her if she'd seen the house -- which she hadn't yet. So we went over there and by noon, they had ripped off the crappy addition, taken off the awning and the concrete slab underneath, and nearly completely stripped the interior. Kitchen? Gone. Basement? Gone. Upstairs walls? Gone. Unbelievable.

By the time school had let out, the concrete to the front door was gone as was the huge azalea bush that Max and his friends had used as a secret fort. The bobcat and backhoe were hard at work digging out the big hole which will soon be the new part of our basement.

It's only the first day, but it was a good, exciting, freakout kind of day. I can say one thing though: I am so glad we decided to move out while the construction was under way! We took lots of pictures, which I'll be posting to Flickr as soon as possible.


Pain

Written by Barry Warsaw in historical on Mon 21 April 2003.

This is a repost from my earlier blog. I totally disavow everything my younger self said. He doesn't know what he's talking about.

There's a Star Trek (original series) episode that I dimly remember. I think it's the one with the rotating stoner light on the ceiling in the penal colony, but I'm not sure. I don't know what's sadder: that I used to be able to name each episode before the first commercial break, or that my memory is so far gone, that I no longer can.

Anyway, I think while Kirk's in the chair transfixed by "the colors, dude!" a man in the next room utters the single word: Pain. And Kirk feels the pain.

I'm thinking of this because I'm doing a CVS merge from the trunk of the Mailman tree into the 2.1 maintenance branch. That perverse little guy who invented CVS has just uttered "Pain" as I stare transfixed at all the pretty colors in my XEmacs buffer. And it hurts like someone knifed open your balls (which has happened to me, but that's probably too much information, huh?).

Why is this so painful? Well, part of the reason is that there are CVS id strings in the files that really shouldn't be there. They just cause conflicts for no good reason. Yeah, I know about -kv, but I know it about the same way I know the Star Trek episode, so it doesn't help me much.

The other reason is worse: there are tons of files that aren't in English and that I didn't write. Because Mailman is internationalized, there are a raft of files containing text in everything from Italian to Japanese, and now (tickling my ethnic pride nose hairs) Polish too. Now, for my own sanity, I'm trying to move to …

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Young Again

Written by Barry Warsaw in historical on Fri 04 April 2003.

This is a repost from my earlier blog. I totally disavow everything my younger self said. He doesn't know what he's talking about.

So I'm blogging. All the kids are doing it and it seems like a great way to rant and vent in a write-only forum. I feel like I did the first time I recompiled my Linux kernel. Once again I can put off my mid-life crisis without having to waste money on a fast car or have a divorce-inducing affair with the babysitter. Blogging is much less likely to have an impact on anybody else in the world, and that's probably a good thing.

Thanks to my colleague Jeremy Hylton for finding a nice Elisp blogging tool which makes it really easy to write these things. Expect a lot of content early on, followed by long periods of inactivity. But no one's reading this anyway, so who cares?

The main thing I've been doing lately is immersing myself in graphical IMAP based mail reading clients. I've been a VM user for years, preferring of course the One True of the One True Editors. But lately I've been disappointed with VM, primarily because of its lack of true remote IMAP support. I use at least 3 different desktop machines (Linux and MacOSX -- I'm Windows free!) regularly, as well as my laptop in various locations, and tunneling XEmacs over SSH is just not cutting it. VM has some support for IMAP but only by sucking all your mail over from the server to the local client, and that just defeats the whole purpose. I might as well burn a DVD with my gig of 20 year old email so I have it with me at all times.

I started out by using Apple's Mail application for OSX. I'm a …

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